• Daily Grateful: Jon Kabat-Zinn Sums it Up

    3.23.2014 Jon Kabat-Zinn. For many, the name has become synonymous with modern mindfulness. As a physician who took a break from his work to study Buddhism in the ’70s, it was a decision that helped lead the beginning of the mindfulness movement in the United States. After training in Buddhism, he came back to his practice with the then-fairly radical idea that the benefits of Buddhist mindfulness could help his patients who were suffering from chronic illness. The result was the Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) program at the University of Massachusetts. Read more here. Watch his presentation at the 2014 Wisdom

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  • Spotlight on Jon Kabat-Zinn: Ancient Practices, Modern Mindfulness

    Jon Kabat-Zinn. For many, the name has become synonymous with modern mindfulness. As a physician who took a break from his work to study Buddhism in the ’70s, it was a decision that helped lead the beginning of the mindfulness movement in the United States. After training in Buddhism, he came back to his practice with the then-fairly radical idea that the benefits of Buddhist mindfulness could help his patients who were suffering from chronic illness. The result was the Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) program at the University of Massachusetts. Although I haven’t participated in an any of his

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  • Mainstream Mindfulness: “Are we in the middle of a mindfulness revolution?”

    That’s the quote from this Huffington Post article about Time Magazine’s latest cover and theme. As an “armchair pop culturo-anthropologist,” I’m fairly certain that the answer is a definitive probably. 🙂 All the signs are there, really, from Time’s latest edition to a lesser known, but increasingly popular magazine called “Mindful;” from police departments helping their offers deal with stress to the Department of Defense looking seriously at mindfulness as a way to combat PTSD, the country is responding to information overload, stress, and anxiety with something that actually works: meditation and mindfulness. My sense is that because the latest research clearly

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  • What is Mindfulness? Psychologist Mark Williams Explains

    “Mindfulness is a form of awareness, really, so we’re all aware sometimes that just as you’re wonderful description of getting up in the morning and as you were driving to work with all these things going through your head, we also know that sometimes we can naturally switch that off sometimes if we take the time to take a walk with a youngster, you know, three or four-year-old, and they’re going very slowly along the road and they’re looking at things.” – Mark Williams In his book, Mindfulness: An Eight-Week Plan for Finding Peace in a Frantic World,  Mark William,

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  • How do you Get into the Mindfulness Zone?

    For some people, it’s yoga; for others, it’s running or lifting weights, or listening to music, or cleaning or just about any other pursuit that doesn’t involve worry and anxiety and “worldly” stress. For me? One way to get into the mindfulness zone comes from stacking rocks. If you follow mindfulness’ Jon Kabat-Zinn’s teachings, you know that the University of Massachusetts meditation luminary prescribes a variety of ways to “get into the zone” of mindfulness. And each person has their own special way to “get there.” Some people practice many different ways of being mindful; of being in the moment.

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  • Why we exhaust ourselves with stress and anxiety, and what you can do about it

    Why we Exhaust Ourselves… Today, people tend to be overwhelmed not just by constant inputs (technologically), but by self-criticism. First, the brain is actually built to focus on the negative; this is an evolutionary vestige built for survival, but today, neuroscientists are aware that it’s not just an annoyance, but that the brain remembers and focuses on he negative much more readily than it does the positive. The brain not only retains more negative memories for longer periods of time, but components of the brain actually work to prevent positive experiences from being retained–all in the name of survival. This was perfectly well and good when

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  • Anxiety, the brain, and modern life: How an ancient biological imperative to survive came to dominate our lives

    As it turns out, all the negativity that humans experience–fear, anxiety, stress response–all are a a natural development in the brain. It’s all a survival mechanism that developed over millennia to “protect” us. But today, we don’t need to escape lions (for the most part) or tribes (for the most part), but the brain doesn’t know that–or much care. If there’s a threat, real or imagined, the brain swings into action to “save the day.” And for the most unlucky people, it can wind up actually killing them, performing an out of control “mindless” task of keeping the body/mind in

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