• Daily Grateful: We Are All Connected – E. Whitacre’s Amazing Virtual Chorus

    January 30, 2014 “185 voices. 243 tracks. 12 countries. A choir unlike any other. What started as a simple social media experiment, has become a poetic metaphor of our shared humanity and the power of connection. Acclaimed composer and conductor Eric Whitacre offered the sheet music of his original composition, “Lux Aurumque”, as a free download and invited singers to submit a video of themselves performing one part (soprano, alto, tenor, or bass). These rather ordinary videos of solo performances were then pieced together to form a choir of singers who have never met each other…but have unwittingly created music

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  • Daily Grateful: Martin Luther King, Jr.

    January 20, 2014 Martin Luther King, Jr. was as spiritual man. His was a connection with brothers and sisters who were different–different beliefs, religions, skin color. He shared the goal of non-violence, acceptance, and love of one another. Yours in Mental Hygiene, The Ancient Brain and Modern Mindfulness

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  • Daily Grateful: Sewing the Seeds of Love

    January 19, 2014 This quote reminds me of how compassion and giving makes the compassionate giver feel as least as good as the one on the receiving end. It also reminded me of the incredibly cool pop song by Tears for Fears–remember them? 😉 (below). Tears for Fears Sowing the Seeds of Love by Celtiemama Lyrics: High time we made a stand & shook up the views of the common man And the love train rides from coast to coast DJ’s the man we love the most Could you be, could you be squeaky clean And smash any hope of

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  • Daily Grateful: The Importance of Humility

    January 5, 2014

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  • Dharma Punk: How One Angry Young Man’s “Rock Bottom” Journey Turned into a Mindfulness Movement

    For many (most?) people, the pain of existence requires some form of escape: for some, it’s food, for others, drugs or alcohol; for still others, it’s obsessive work or other obsessive behaviors and actions. But for all, these are attempts at escaping something that cannot be escaped–only accepted and “observed” as conditions of the world. For many, hitting “rock” bottom is the reason for changing, for attempting to improve themselves and trying something different. That was the case for me, and it was, as I found out, the case for a group of punks in California some years back. One

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  • A Thoughtful Argument for Mindfulness

    No Two Journeys are Alike, but We are all on the same Path When you stop and think about it, we have this moment, and then the next, and the next, but it’s inevitable that at some point, we will run out moments in this corporeal state. I remember reading Carlos Castaneda as a young man about the importance of living in the moment and the fact that death “is the only wise adviser that we have.” His was the argument for embracing all moments and that each day should be treated as one’s last, because it very well might

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  • Anxiety, Survival, and Wellness

    Anxiety and Survival: Genetically Complementary As it turns out, much of the negativity that humans experience–fear, anxiety, stress response–all are a a natural development in the brain. It’s all a survival mechanism that developed over millennia to “protect” us. But today, we don’t need to escape lions (for the most part) or tribes (for the most part), but the brain doesn’t know that–or much care. If there’s a threat, real or imagined (and most fears for the modern human are often imagined), the brain swings into action to “save the day.” And for the most unlucky people, it can wind

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  • Daily Grateful: I Am Malala

    December 24, 2013 About Malala. Many people know the story of Malala, but for those who do not, it goes like this: Malala Yousafzai was born in Pakistan on July 12, 1997 and lived in he Swat District of Pakistan’s northwestern Khyber Pakhtunkhwa province. This brave young girl wrote a blog advocating the rights of education and for women, especially in the Swat Valley, where the Taliban had banned girls from attending school. In  2009, when Yousafzai was just 11 years old, she wrote a blog under a pseudonym for the BBC of her life under the Taliban and their attempts to take control of the

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  • Daily Grateful: Letting Go

    December 23, 2013 Western Medicine Acknowledges the Importance of Letting Go. The importance of letting go isn’t just an Buddhist belief or core tenet, it’s also increasingly understood in the west as critical to well being. Even the Mayo Clinic devotes an entire page to letting go of resentment and anger–feelings and emotions that serve no purpose other than to keep us in a negative feedback loop. They summarize it as lack of forgiveness: If you’re unforgiving, you might pay the price repeatedly by bringing anger and bitterness into every relationship and new experience. Your life might become so wrapped

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  • Daily Grateful: A Couple of Firsts…

    December 20, 2013 One can be too focused on the past, leading to depressing thoughtsof longing that can lead to looping negativity. But remembrances of times when things were SO incredibly new and fun can be healthy. Just as eyes are less clear over time as we age, so too can our experiences of events and things be dulled (and not just ushumans–think how kittens change into cats who just sort of look at you after a while. They don’t attack your feet as much, ya know?). Enjoy these firsts and rekindle the wonderment of youth! 🙂 THE TRAIN ARRIVAL

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  • Wake Up! – Guest Post by Life Coach and Yoga Teacher Brett Avelin

    Waking up is a real thing and possible for all of us. The thing is, we really have to give ourselves to it first to get a taste for it. It’s a feeling that bleeds through every perception and is not dependent on anything to be a certain way. Not a feeling that is based on positive or negative thoughts or surroundings to be present… 
it shines right through even the cloudiest day or the dirtiest street. 
it has an effulgence even though it is also empty, strange that way. Many of my clients describe the inner work of waking up to

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  • Anxiety, the brain, and modern life: How an ancient biological imperative to survive came to dominate our lives

    As it turns out, all the negativity that humans experience–fear, anxiety, stress response–all are a a natural development in the brain. It’s all a survival mechanism that developed over millennia to “protect” us. But today, we don’t need to escape lions (for the most part) or tribes (for the most part), but the brain doesn’t know that–or much care. If there’s a threat, real or imagined, the brain swings into action to “save the day.” And for the most unlucky people, it can wind up actually killing them, performing an out of control “mindless” task of keeping the body/mind in

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